B&B Triflo Exhaust

B&B Triflo Exhaust

April 28, 1999

By: Robert Leidy

Supersprint Exhaust for the 2.8 Z3

Pros: Better Performance, Great Sound, Stainless Steel
Cons: Expensive, Installation
Cost: $614 (from BMP Design)
$563 Straight Tips with free shipping (from HMS)
$649 DTM Tips with free shipping (from HMS)

In the never ending quest to find more power and otherwise tinker with my car, I decided to put a new Supersprint catalyst-back (cat-back) exhaust on my beloved BMW Z3. I have a ’97 model with the M52 2.8 liter engine.

The upgrade had three desired goals/expectations

I was looking to improve the sound of the exhaust. The stock exhaust didn’t sound “bad”, it was just too quiet for my taste. I had previously heard other 2.8 liter Z3s with the Supersprint exhaust so I was quite confident that I would be pleased with the sound.

I was hoping to improve performance of the Z3 as well. This goal was questionable, several had speculated that there wouldn’t be an improvement in performance. However there were even more saying there would be. In order to satisfy my own curiosity I decided to do before and after dynamometer (dyno) runs on the car to measure before and after rear wheel horsepower and torque.

The final expectation was purely cosmetic. I had already added chrome tips to the stock 2.8 exhaust (picture above) but after seeing the larger turned up DTM tips available on the Supersprint exhaust I decided I liked the looks of them much better (right picture).

With these goals in mind I enlisted the help of Robert Leidy, who had already found a reputable dyno shop when he measured the power output from his M roadster. Since Robert and the dyno shop (Alamo Autosports) were both located in the greater Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas (DFW) area, and I was located in Houston, there was a bit of a logistical problem. Answer: Roadtrip!

To ensure a proper installation, Larry Nissen from Moritz BMW in Arlington was invited. To ensure accurate dyno tests the following “recommended” process was used. We first backed the car onto Alamo’s dyno rack to get a baseline HP for the car. We then used the very same dyno lift to install the supersprint exhaust. Once the exhaust was installed the car was then re-dynoed to measure the change.

Installation

Prior to installing the Supersprint exhaust, three “before” or baseline dyno tests were preformed. The results of those test will be compared to the results from the “after” dyno tests in the next part of this article. But for now let me explain the installation process that took place between the before and after dyno tests.

The keen eye will notice that the pictures on this page are from two different vehicles. Prior to my installation, another Z3 owner had installed a Supersprint exhaust on his Z3 and Robert was there to take pictures of that installation as well. The only difference between the two Supersprint exhausts were the type of exhaust tips. Chris got the straight tips and I got the turned up or DTM style tips. Since the type of tips on the end of the exhaust have very little impact on installation the two sets of pictures could be used together.

The first step was to remove the stock exhaust, problem was we had just completed the first set of dyno tests so the stock exhaust was hot. After the stock exhaust cooled down to a point where we were able to hold it (15 minutes) we were able to remove it.

The exhaust is held in place in four places (pictures below). The first (front most) connection is where the exhaust bolts onto the flange of the catalytic converter via two 2 13mm nuts and bolts. The middle connection is actually just a safety/backup connection, but it uses a rubber belt (attached to the vehicle) around an additional bracket (attached to the exhaust) to catch the exhaust if the rear mounts fail.

Towards the rear bumper, two additional rubber rings support and attach the rear of the exhaust to the vehicle. In order to remove them we sprayed the rubber muffler hangers with lubricant and then popped them loose using a pry-bar. The actual order we used in removing the exhaust was to loosen the front bolts, unbolt/remove the middle bracket. Then with someone holding the front of the exhaust, the rear connections were worked loose. With a person holding either end the removal was easily accomplished, however it would have been rather difficult with only one person. trying to juggle both ends.

After removing the stock exhaust it was time to unpack the Supersprint exhaust. I purchased this exhaust from BMP, it came very well packaged, the entire exhaust was wrapped in thick shrink wrap with additional padding covering the exhaust tips. Not sure if this is something BMP does or if all Supersprint exhausts come this way. The packaging provided a very effective protective layer over the exhaust, however the shrink-wrap was so tight one of the support brackets was bent. We didn’t realize this at the time, but later it was easy to fix by just bending the support back to its normal position, the catch of course being that you won’t know what the “normal” position is until you’ve got the exhaust installed and you’re trying to put the rubber hangers on.

There is one important part I should point out, you better get a friend to carry the new and old exhaust for you. The exhaust is rather large and does not fit in the trunk (not even close). You could carry the new exhaust up front with you but the used/stock exhaust will be very dirty. For this installation Nancy carried my exhaust along with Alan’s two exhausts in her SUV. Once the stock exhausts were removed we wrapped them in trash bags and duct tape for the drive home.

Comparing the stock and Supersprint exhaust side by side was interesting. The Supersprint exhaust looked quite handsome with its black-crackle finish and polished stainless steel tips. It also looked much more svelte and linear than the stock exhaust. The stock exhaust had 4 diameter changes in just the piping alone. The resonator and the garbage-can-sized muffler looked like something off of a truck when compared with the Supersprint. There was a brief moment where I thought BMP had shipped me the wrong exhaust. The muffler part of the exhaust was smaller so the rear support arms were longer (to make up the difference). But what concerned me was how much different the connection from the catalytic converter to the muffler was. The Supersprint still had the crimp in the exhaust but the path seemed much straighter. However my concerns of receiving the wrong exhaust were removed when we stacked the two exhausts on top of each other and noticed the mounting locations were the same.

Mounting the new exhaust was a definite two-man job. The “safety hanger” was reinserted into the rubber hanger/bracket, and the flange-end of the exhaust was fitted to the catalytic converter, loosely fitting the nuts. We then re-popped the muffler hangers on to the Supersprint, and VOILA!, it didn’t fit. We stepped back to analyze the situation and found immediately that the hanger brackets on the Supersprint had been bent somewhere along its route from Italy to Texas. Using the biggest pair of channel-locks we could find, we adjusted the brackets to proper alignment, and VOILA!, it still didn’t fit.

We has been warned by other Z3 exhaust upgraders that the tight fit of the exhaust tail pipes had previously led to some bumper trim scarring/melting. Because of this warning we were paying very close attention to how the tips fit in the cutout. Ahead of time we were warned that the exhaust tips will move towards the drivers side of the cutout when the exhaust gets hot and back towards the passenger side when it cools back down. So our goal was to get the exhaust tips to hang towards the passenger side of the cutout as much as possible (exhaust was cold as we were mounting it).

The problem we ran into was after installing the exhaust we noticed the tips were already off center towards the drivers side. We knew that this was going to be a problem because once the exhaust got hot it would push even further towards the drivers side and probably scar/melt the bumper trim. Further analysis indicated that the “safety hanger” on the Supersprint was too far to the passenger side of the car. After inspecting how the bracket worked we determined that the sides of the bracket serve very little purpose because the support loop uses the top of the bracket. We were also told that this bracket is just a backup bracket in case the rear ones fail.

For a brief moment we considered removing it all together, but then we thought of a better plan. We decided to modify the safety bracket, since it appeared cheaper to replace than the exhaust if we screwed it up (Supersprint has been informed of the problem and is investigating a solution). The bracket pictured to the left is after the modification (compare it to one of the pictures at the top of this page and you will noticed the removed metal). The fine folks at Alamo ground off one side of the bracket, and after we re-installed everything the exhaust was no longer being pushed against the drivers side of the rear bumper apron.

All that remained was to fine-tune placement of the tips within the rear bumper apron. This was accomplished using the aforementioned massive channel-lock pliers to tweak the muffler hanger brackets. We aligned the exhaust to “dress to the right” when cold, as 2.8 Supersprint exhausts are known to shift left about one-half inch at operating temperatures. It looked fantastic.

Update: Supersprint is modifying all current and future 2.8 Z3 exhaust systems to correct for the safety bracket misalignment. Supersprint is also adding side-to-side adjustable hangers to allow for precise fitting of the exhaust tips in the cutout.

Performance

Now that the Supersprint exhaust was installed, it was time to dyno again. When we first ran the car on the dyno, (pre-exhaust) I was nervous to say the least. My car already had the Dinan High Flow Cold Air Intake System and Dinan ECU upgrade (not really a “chip” anymore) and I had heard ad-nauseum about how the adaptive nature of the OBD II ECU software would show no power gains no matter what.

Running your car on a dyno is one of those surreal experiences you have to do once in your life. On a lift dyno, your car is roughly four feet in the air strapped to the lift, going 70+ mph The image of the car shooting off the lift keeps popping up in one’s mind. Anyway, we do three baseline runs. They are all pretty consistent, with the best being 167.6 hp and 175.5 ft lbs of torque. Remember that this it rear-wheel horsepower and torque, not the crankshaft horsepower and torque as quoted by the factory.

After we installed the Supersprint we fired up the engine to warm it up, and it sounded fantastic, too. Stock, the car just didn’t have a sporty-enough sound. With the addition of the Dinan Intake and ECU upgrade, it had a very feral howl, but only on wide-open throttle. The Supersprint exhaust added a “bass track” to the sound, sounding it out nicely. Now, full throttle applications combine the howl with a deep growl, making for a formidable sounding beast.

Below is an amusing animated picture Robert created from a couple still pictures his camcorder recorded. The first frame is from the “before” dyno test with the stock exhaust. The second frame is hours later from the “after” dyno test with the Supersprint exhaust (with turned up DTM style exhaust tips). I’m sure the angle of the exhaust tips had more to do with it than the amount of exhaust, but notice the Dynojet banner in the background. Now that’s what I call a free flowing exhaust 🙂

Once we warmed up the car, it was time to dyno. The sound of the car running up to over 70 mph in what was essentially a one-car garage was a sound not easily forgotten. One alarming note, though, was the plumes of smoke emanating from the rear of the car. Turns out that it was the exhaust burning off coatings, grease, and other contaminants. It had a mighty stench as well, which I was told would linger for about 500 miles. I was glad I had a long roadtrip home.

Once again, we do three runs, and they are again very consistent. This time the best one is 171.7 hp and 181.1 ft lbs of torque. Click on the small portion of the graph to the right to see the full size before and after comparison of the torque curve. At the peak torque values, the Supersprint exhaust gained 5.6 ft/lbs of torque. Looking at the entire RPM torque curve and measuring the differences every 50 RPM the Supersprint exhaust averages a gain of 4.3 ft/lbs of torque between 2000 and 6200 RPM.

It would appear that this is an apples and oranges comparison, and it is somewhat. However, there are correction factors, and the one we’ll use here has been ascribed to a well known Utah-based chip tuner, but I can’t confirm that origin. This correction factor to convert rear wheel HP to crank HP is 1.21, or about a 17.2% loss. Given that, my numbers would work out as follows using the equation RW * CF = C, where RW is rear wheel HP or Torque, CF is the above correction factor, and C is the crank HP or Torque.

Stock 1997 2.8 – factory specs

189 HP

156.2 HP – converted to rear wheel

203 ft-lbs Torque

167.8 ft-lbs Torque – converted to rear wheel

With Chip & Intake:

167.6 * 1.21 = 202.8 HP

175.5 * 1.21 = 212.4 ft-lbs Torque

Chip & Intake gain over stock:

13.8 HP – estimated @ crank

11.4 HP – estimated @ rear wheel

9.4 ft-lbs Torque – estimated @ crank

7.7 ft-lbs Torque – estimated @ rear wheel

With Chip, Intake & Exhaust:

172.6 * 1.21 = 208.9 HP – estimated @ crank

181.1 * 1.21 = 219.1 ft-lbs Torque – estimated @ crank

Chip, Intake & Exhaust gain over stock:

19.9 HP – estimated @ crank

16.4 HP – estimated @ rear wheel

16.1 ft-lbs Torque – estimated @ crank

13.2 ft-lbs Torque – estimated @ rear wheel

Chip, Intake & Exhaust gain over Chip & Intake:

6.1 HP – estimated @ crank

5.0 HP – measured @ rear wheel

6.8 ft-lbs Torque – estimated @ crank

5.6 ft-lbs Torque – measured @ rear wheel

So what does this tell us? Well, if we believe in rear wheel measurements only, I got a 5 HP, 5.9 ft-lbs, increase in overall power. Examining the dyno curves, this really makes itself known over the 3000 – 5500 rpm range. I am happy, and I can feel a difference.

Sound

Bryan: One month after install

Living with the exhaust has been a pleasant experience. I had to first get over the feeling that someone was following me, as I wasn’t used to the subtle tone of the exhaust coming from the rear at all RMPs. Next, I was worried about the much larger exhaust melting the rear bumper fascia. I’ve seen some exhaust applications that have eaten holes in the fascia, but that hasn’t been a real problem. There has been a little scorching on the inside lips of both sides of the fascia, but nothing to be concerned about. One very unexpected benefit is that my gas mileage has increased by 1-2 miles per gallon. Bottom line: would I do it again? Yes. What would I change? the safety bracket

Chris: 1 month after install

Chris Bull checked the rear apron around his Supersprint exhaust installation with straight tips and reports that no melting or scarring has taken place. He is VERY pleased with the upgrade and highly recommends the Supersprint exhaust to other 2.8 Z3 owners.

Spence: 1 month after install

Chuck Spensor checked the rear apron around his Supersprint exhaust installation with DTM style tips and reports that there is some melting on the drivers side. However the scarred area is not very noticeable and the exhaust tip hides most of the damage. He is VERY pleased with the upgrade and highly recommends the Supersprint exhaust to other 2.8 Z3 owners.

Update from Supersprint:

There are two different 2.8 Z3 exhausts, one for the ’99 on Z3 2.8 coupe and roadster, and one for the ’98 and before Z3 2.8 roadster. The part number for the 99 is 78.67.06 or 78.67.66 (I guess one is straight tips and the other is dtm–don’t know which is which). Supersprint experimented with a ’99 Z3 2.8 coupe and moved the center bracket approximately 6-8 mm towards the driver’s side of the car to give it a perfect fit. They did many runs to get the exhaust up to temperature and verified that it did not come into contact with the apron even under hard cornering. One point to note is that the ’99 models apparently have a bigger cutout in the rear apron than the ones before that. For the ’98 and before 2.8 roadster, Supersprint is modifying all current and future stock to have a side-to-side adjustable hanger to allow for precise fitting.

Supersprint Exhaust for the M Roadster

Pros: Great Sound, Increased Performance, Visually Striking, 100% Stainless Steel
Cons: Cost, Installation
Cost: $1,402 (from BMP Design)
$1,339 with free shipping (from HMS Motorsport)

The M roadster has a fairly impressive stock exhaust–quad polished tips exit from dual mufflers and emit a mellow note. However, like anything in life, even something good can be improved. Supersprint has made aftermarket exhaust systems for BMWs for years, has been making high-quality exhaust systems since 1955, and is highly regarded. In fact, the quality of the exhaust meets TUV standards for construction and is treated as if it were an OEM exhaust in Germany, which typically is very picky about aftermarket modifications to cars.

Supersprint is based in Italy, and their official U.S. Importer is BMP Design, based in Texas. BMP carries the full Supersprint line, including the 100% stainless steel dual M roadster exhaust with quad DTM tips. The exhausts arrived in perfect condition (a feat in itself given that the shipment consisted of two 6-foot-long boxes that had to travel from Italy to BMP in Texas, and then from there to the reviewer). The packaging is first-rate, with the exhausts themselves being sealed in plastic, with special packing around the tips to preserve them, and with plenty of paper padding protecting the exhausts inside the boxes.

The pictures above exhibit the external differences between the Supersprint exhaust (left) and the stock exhaust (right). The tips are larger and upturned, the muffler itself is smaller, and the whole system is bead-polished to a high shine. As the arrow shows, the Supersprint exhaust also features straighter pipe between the fitting (which will be attached just behind the catalytic converter) and the muffler.

A side note: When arranging for a place to install the Supersprint exhaust, it may be best to also arrange for a friend with either a sports utility vehicle or a pickup truck to be available to help you transport the new exhaust to the installation location, and to help you transport the old exhaust home.

Installation

The exhaust is held in place with bolts just aft of the catalytic converters (red arrows), and a set of brackets/rubber attachment points (second picture) at the rear of the car. The the middle there is a safety/backup hanger (blue arrow) which has a rubber belt around the middle of the exhaust.

Some spray silicone lubricant on the middle bracket may make it easier to slide the belt holding the exhaust off the support. Once this middle connection is free you can remove the front bolts to break the connection to the catalytic converter. Lastly remove the bolts attaching the rubber hangers at the rear of the car.

After removing the stock exhausts, it is time to mount the new Supersprint exhausts. The best way to do this is to first guide the main support into the rubber hanger (blue arrow above) and then to loosely fasten the remaining brackets and bolts. Then, with a couple of people helping, you can align the exhaust and tighten the bolts. (Note that in most cases, we do not recommend hanging from the new exhaust as an alignment method.)

Take your time while adjusting the new exhausts. Even when everything looks fine from under the car, you may still want to tweak the alignment. You want to make sure that the tips are not in contact with the plastic of the rear bumper. Maintain about a finger’s width clearance between the tips and the lower lip of the bumper. Also, stand behind the car and check that each side is symmetrical. As you can see from the picture above, the right tips are slightly rotated clockwise, and need to be adjusted for a better match with the left side.

There were only two negatives to the installation. The first is just due to the inexperience of the reviewer–alignment took a long time. If you have an exhaust shop install your exhaust, this is a non-issue. The second negative is that the new exhausts did not come with 4 necessary nuts and washers. The stock exhaust has nuts integrated into its brackets which bolts go into, while the Supersprint exhaust just has holes in its brackets which bolts go through. This necessitated a quick trip to a hardware store, and cost about $1.00. It is not clear if the missing nuts were an oversight or if they must always be purchased separately, but Supersprint has been notified of this slight glitch and is looking into the issue.

Overall, the installation was uneventful, and took about 2 hours–not bad for a do-it-yourself job. A muffler shop would probably knock out the job in less than half the time. The final result is a set of 4 gleaming tips which emit a healthy growl.

Ok, so it looks and sounds great. Now you want to know about the performance:

Performance

Note: Alamo Autosports is recommended to those in the North Texas area for dyno testing. $60 buys you 3 runs on a Dynojet Dynamometer, worth it just for the experience of seeing and hearing your car dynoed. Contact Brice, Steve Pak, or Steve Webb at

Alamo Autosports

1218 Colorado Ln.

Arlington, TX 76015

817-860-4300

There is a lot of discussion over whether you can improve a car’s performance by replacing the stock exhaust with a “free-flow” aftermarket exhaust. How best to come up with a quantitative answer? With before and after dyno runs, of course.

A day on the dyno at Alamo Autosports in Arlington, TX was scheduled.

Three stock dyno runs were done. They were all close, but the best and worst were thrown out for the purposes of this article. The M roadster, with stock exhaust and no performance modifications, reached a peak rear-wheel horsepower of 217 between 6150 and 6250 RPM. Peak rear-wheel torque was measured at 217 ft./lbs. between 4000 and 4150 RPM. At the bottom of this section of the article is a chart with the full numbers, and the full-size graph of the stock HP and torque curves may be seen by clicking on the small graph at right.

How might an aftermarket exhaust improve performance? By freeing the exhaust flow. This picture shows one way the Supersprint exhaust improves over the stock exhaust. The pipes shown go between the connection at the rear of the catalytic converter and the muffler. The Supersprint exhaust is on top, and the stock exhaust is on bottom. Notice how the Supersprint exhaust pipe takes a straighter path. Also notice how the stock exhaust is somewhat crimped in the middle (to clear a chassis cross-member, which the Supersprint avoids by routing the pipe slightly lower).

After the three “before” runs were completed, the car was driven off of the dyno and allowed to cool. After cooldown, the car was put back on the dyno (used as a lift), and the Supersprint exhaust was installed. After installation was complete, three “after” dyno runs were conducted. Peak torque gain was 6 ft./lbs., and peak HP gain was 5 HP. Since the dyno runs were conducted immediately after the exhaust installation, the numbers reported are for a non-broken-in exhaust. A follow-up set of dyno runs is planned to acquire HP and torque curves for the exhaust after break-in.

Click on the left picture below to hear and see one of the dyno runs after the Supersprint exhaust was installed. The video is of the Supersprint run that produced the highest HP value. Please note that the numbers below are from the middle stock dyno and the middle Supersprint dyno, so the peak HP below is 1 less than the peak HP mentioned in the video.

Click on the right graph below to see the full-size comparison of before and after torque curves. As you can see from the graph, there is a definite increase in torque (important for acceleration) in the entire midrange.

Sound

The Supersprint exhaust produces a deeper and slightly louder sound than the stock exhaust. Do not take this to mean that it is overwhelmingly loud. The Supersprint exhaust meets tough European TUV standards for sound levels. The second-best way to describe the sound is that it makes the M roadster sound like it should sound. The best way to describe the sound, of course, is to let you hear it for yourself. You will need the RealPlayer to hear the audio, if you don’t have the RealPlayer the good news is it is free!.

The sound recordings were made during dyno runs of the stock exhaust and the Supersprint exhaust. A Hi8 camcorder was used to capture the audio, and was placed about 6 feet to the side of the car and slightly behind the car. RealAudio is by no means a crystal clear audio media, but comparing the sound files (Stock vs Supersprint) is a really good comparison of the real life difference. Once the Supersprint exhaust is fully broken in, a “run through the gears” sound sample will be added to this page.

Stock M roadster

Supersprint M roadster

Model Year 2000 Observations

The model year 2000 Z3s arrived in Dallas, after work I dropped by to take a look at them. The following article reviews my first hand observations and opinions of the differences I noticed. These are just my personal opinions, feel free to disagree with me, however the goal of this article is really just to point out the differences I noticed.

The most noticeable difference is the new back end. Personally I have mixed emotions about the new design, from the back I like the new “L” shaped tail lights. However from the side the new design makes the rear wheel wells appear larger, and with the standard 16″ wheels I personally don’t like the new look. The new design makes the wheels look small especially on the white Z3 I first observed.

The trunk gets the once optional (but very hard to install) trunk lifter ring now as standard equipment. Besides the obvious usefulness of this accessory, the additional chrome on the new trunk lid is eye catching. I especially liked the additional flash of chrome against the new Oxford Green metallic paint.

Inside the trunk I noticed that the trunk lid was redesigned, the new trunk lid design inhibits use of the BMW trunk organizer. So now the trunk organizer only works with 1996-1999 model year BMW Z3s.

This was the first time I had seen the new Oxford Green paint. It is very similar shade of green to the original Dark Green, except it is a metallic paint. I personally like the Oxford Green more than the original Dark Green, however I think I still prefer the original metallic Boston Green (which is now sadly discontinued). I noticed a new red reflective bumper marker on the corner of the bumper, but I don’t personally care for it.

This was also the first time saw the Impala Brown paint. Too dark to call gold, too metallic to call brown, its similar in color to a used (not new) US penny. I liked the color in general, but for some reason it just seemed out of place on a Z3. I bet it looks better out in the sun, but I shudder to think what it will look like when it is dirty.

The 3rd brake light is relocated further down on the trunk lid, more in the middle of the trunk as compared to the original design that was more towards the top of the trunk lid. Not sure if the average (non Z3 owner) would ever notice the difference, but I think I like the original position better just because I like the longer (more noticeable) indention it left in the trunk lid.

Walking around to the front of the car I noticed the new chrome ringed headlights. The difference is subtle, but really nice. I like the change, it especially blends nicely with the new clear/white turn signals which are now standard with the model year 2000 Z3. Of all the small changes BMW has made to the Z3 over the years, I think the clear turn signals are the one change I most wish was on my M roadster.

Looking inside the car I found even more changes. The AC controls now have chrome rings just like on the M roadster, the lower panel now has an additional chrome gauge that can either be an analog clock or the optional on board computer. It is my opinion that the clock is far more attractive, even if the on board computer were a free upgrade I think I would still choose the clock.

This Z3 had an optional wood package installed that was very attractive. The package now also includes a wood brake handle. The wood is lighter in color than the previous wood package and it has a different wood grain pattern in it. The kit looked very good with the tan interior however I’m not sure it will work with the black interior.

It appears that the Z3 no longer comes with the cassette holder. Of the model year 2000 Z3s I saw about half had the dealer installed armrest/cupholder (pictured above and too the right) and the other half didn’t have anything (pictured directly to the right). Current rumor is that starting 7/99 the factory will start including a armrest which may or may not be the one the dealerships have been installing for free.

Behind the armrest is a new set of knockout switch locations. Since this Z3 had the optional power top this is where the power top switch was located. I found this location to be very awkward to use when seated in the drivers seat. If this were my Z3 I think I would ask if the DSC switch could be mounted here and move the power top switch to a more convenient location. But that is only because I see myself using the DSC much less than a power top switch.

The impala brown classic leather was very nice, it didn’t have the polka-dot bumpy pattern that use to be on every leather Z3 seat. The color of the leather match the exterior and looked very sharp. This new leather was darker and more golden brown color than the previous tan/beige leather. According to the BMW color chart classic leather is available in this brown or a black color.

Behind the seats the rear speakers appear to be slightly larger. On close observation I noticed the entire rear console to be slightly different. While the plastic parts that make up the rear console didn’t change shape, the once smooth plastic now has a texture to it. However the new texture is only on the upper most parts of the console.

The other change to the stock rear console is the loss of the rear storage compartment. The stock stereo now includes a subwoofer, however it’s not the HK subwoofer. I sneaked a peak at the subwoofer by removing the grill and it looked quite different than the HK subwoofer. There was not a porting tube, and I saw one driver (there might have been another one hidden).

The top now has a liner, the liner is black (or really dark gray). The material has a slick sheen finish to it with a thin foam like backing. The thin material folds well when the top is down and pulls tight when the top is raised. The liner does not extend beyond the roll hoops when the top is up, so the area around the rear window is not covered by the liner.

Classic also had a couple model year 2000 M roadsters, including one unsold cosmos black/gray/black model that was going through dealer prep when I saw it. The 2000 M roadster has the same liner the 2000 Z3 has, as well as the new chrome ringed headlights. However with the exception of a new harmon/karmon label on the HK subwoofer grill, I did not see any other differences.

Speaking of the M roadster there is two other additions to the Z3 that I didn’t get a usable pictures of. The Z3 now has the ///M logoed sport steering wheel and the ///M logoed lighted shift knob which are nice additions, but I find the ///M logo use in a non M vehicle to be highly unstable.

In addition to the vehicles I took pictures of, Classic BMW also showed me a model year 2000 Z3 in steel gray and titanium silver. I was unable to tell a difference between the new titanium silver and the now discontinued arctic silver without the two cars sitting right next to each other. The titanium silver is one or two shades lighter, but in direct sunlight that difference is really hard to notice.