Improving the Boot Cover Snaps

When I first got my Z3, I used the boot cover regularly, but then over time I slowly started using it less and less. I had always considered it a purely cosmetic piece of equipment and eventually grew tired of the hassle of installing it.

When I traded in my Z3 to get an M roadster, I took the new boot cover out of the trunk and put it on the shelf where it pretty much stayed. The few times I used it left me frustrated at how hard it was to install. I’m not sure why the new one was harder to install than the old one. I kept trying to convince myself, “maybe if I use it more, the boot cover will get broken in and be easier to install.”

Despite my repeated attempts, the boot cover would eventually find its way back onto the shelf for another extended stay. I had become spoiled with the power top, and found the boot to only lesson its usefulness. I had also become lazy and just plain fed up with the hassle of installing the boot cover.

The boot cover made a comeback when I started using the roadster tonneau cover. The tonneau cover required the boot cover be installed to function, but it also enabled me to keep the boot cover on for extended periods of time. The two products proved to be a great combination when the weather allowed for extended top-down periods. But the tonneau isn’t a year-round product, and eventually the boot cover found its way back onto the shelf for another extended stay.

Then I installed a light gray interior liner to the convertible top. It didn’t take me long to realize that light gray doesn’t look very good dirty. Without the boot cover, the liner was picking up a lot of dirt and dust when the top was down. So now I’ve got two accessories somewhat dependent on the BMW boot cover. So I find myself once again saying, “maybe if I use it more, the boot cover will get broken in and be easier to install.” I still hold some hope in that theory, however this time I’m going to make things a little easier on myself.

I remembered an additional paragraph tacked onto the end of the original BMW windscreen instructions that said to install some washers to make the boot easier to use with that windscreen. BMW doesn’t even make that windscreen anymore, but I managed to find my old copy of those instructions and figured I would share an old idea (slightly modified) to those that were not Z3 owners back in 1996 when the first windscreen was introduced. The official name for this “knob thingy” is a Tenax fastener. There are two of them screwed into the back of the storage area that the boot cover snaps onto. The theory behind the fix is that if these fasteners were sticking out a little farther, the boot cover would be easier to install since you were not having to stretch it as much.

Once you locate these two Tenax fasteners, you can unscrew them with a standard 11/32 open ended wrench. The screws are longer than you would think they should be, but this extra length is about to work to our advantage.

The original BMW instructions had you using standard everyday washers. However, on the suggestion of an MZ3.Net reader I went to the hardware store and found some black rubber faucet washers. Looking at the different sizes I determined that the “00 Flat Washers” appeared to be just what I was looking for. I used one of them on each side rather than a stack of regular washers.

With the rubber washers installed behind the Tenax screws, the fastener portion of the snap now sticks out an extra 1/8 inch. That small difference makes the boot cover a little easier to install. However, even with this addition, I still consider the boot cover a pain to put on. But this upgrade cost me under a dollar, so I’ll take any help I can get and I’ll keep telling myself, “maybe if I use it more, the boot cover will get broken in and be easier to install.”

Discuss this article and other Convenience upgrades in the

///MZ3.Net discussion forum.