Skaggs Pedals

I have been wanting to install a set of aluminum pedals for quite awhile on my Z3. Most of the sets I’ve seen I don’t really care for the looks of. A few months back a friend sent me some pictures of the pedals that John Skaggs builds, installed on his M Coupe. After seeing them they were the ones for me. Problem was John didn’t have them in production at the time so I had to wait for the next batch which turned out to be a four month wait. The wait was worth it.

The three pedal set (clutch, brake, gas) costs about $96 but John also builds a heel/toe gas pedal as an option. I decided to buy both throttle pedals to determine which I preferred. The cost was about $160 for everything.

To install the pedals you will need:

* drill with 7/64″ drill bit (and safety glasses)

* open ended wrench (1/4″) and also a socket and wrench of the same size

I started off on the clutch pedal. You just remove the rubber cover from the pedal and center the new aluminum cover on the pedal itself. While holding the cover in place drill out the bottom hole. WATCH YOUR FINGERS!!! Now install which ever color bolt you want (black or silver) through the cover and secure in place with the nut. The supplied Allen wrench will let you tighten the bolts, the nuts will start to thread until they hit the nylon lock-stops. After that point you will need to use the wrench or socket (whichever fits better for that position) to tighten the bolt.

Make sure you have the pedal leveled and drill one of the remaining two holes and fasten it in place, then repeat that with the third hole. The clutch is the easiest to do as you can easily get the nuts on and the pedal is plastic so it is easy to drill.

Next is the brake pedal. Do exactly the same with it as the clutch. This is a little harder as the pedal itself is metal so drilling takes a little more care and time.

Now comes the fun one… the gas pedal. The new pedal just mounts over the factory plastic pedal. If you are trying both pedals install the regular (smaller) one first. If you do the heel/toe pedal first you might position the mounting holes so that the regular pedal will not totally cover the black plastic when viewed from straight on.

Position the smaller gas pedal over the factory pedal in such a way as it is covering the black plastic. If you stand the aluminum pedal on the plastic I found that the aluminum pedal needed to be tilted counterclockwise slightly for good coverage. The bottom right side of the pedal does not quite rest flush with the floor in the positioning I used. When you have it positioned properly hold it in place and drill out the bottom left side hole, again watching your fingers, and install the nut+bolt and tighten it down.

Double check that the pedal is still positioned properly, adjust as needed, and drill out the upper right hand side hole. Again, fasten it with the nut and bolt. This is where it gets interesting as it is very hard to get behind the pedal to get the nut threaded as you have to go by feel. I found a pretty simple way of doing it though.

Take the tape and cut off a small piece and double it over so it is sticky on both sides. Put that on the tip of your finger and stick the nut to it.

Do not put the bolt in the hole yet but have it and the Allen wrench ready. Reach around behind the pedal with your nut/finger while looking through the hole. Position the nut so it is pushing up against the back of the pedal and align the two holes. Now just hold that in place and put the bolt in and tighten it down. When the nut starts to spin on the tape it means you have it threaded. The tape can be removed from the nut and you then tighten it down fully. You will need this trick for the remaining two holes.

Drill the either of the remaining holes and secure with the bolt+nut then do the other one.

If you went with the regular gas pedal it will look like this.

The black plastic on the side of the gas pedal is visible only from the side as the pedal itself is fairly deep. I positioned the pedal so that it was even along the length of the aluminum pedal.

The heel/toe is below.

After that just vacuum your carpets to get out all the shavings from drilling and you are done.

It took about 2 « hours to install everything and that was including both gas pedals and struggling with the gas pedal nuts before I came up with the trick.

I liked the heel/toe pedal so I’m going to leave that one on for now. Heel+toeing is VERY easy with this pedal installed. My size 12 feet probably make it even easier. In fact it is so easy you may do it by accident until you get the hang of it. If you don’t know what heel+toeing is or don’t really know why you would want to do it you should probably just use the regular gas pedal. Ditto if your car tends to be driven by more then just yourself as it could throw another driver.

BTW, I have it on very good authority that these pedals are not slippery when wet like most aluminum pedals are said to be. Haven’t tried it myself yet but considering the source I’m sure that will be true.