Stopping Brake Squeaks

For some reason I associate brake squeak with old junker cars. It was embarrassing for me when my Z3 started making those annoying high pitched squeaks every time I came to a stop sign. After some research the solution was cheap and easy.

The first thing I learned was that I misunderstood what brake squeaks were. I thought it was the friction between the brake pad and the disc that caused the squeak. Turns out that most brake squeaks are from the brake pad moving around and rubbing against the caliper.

I had heard of anti-brake squeak stuff before but I always dismissed it because I thought anything between the brake pad and the rotor was a temporary solution at best since it would wear away quickly. Once I learned this stuff was for the back of the brakes everything made since. The guy at the NAPA store laughed and said “can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen this stuff used on the wrong side”. NAPA’s CRC Brake Disc Quiet was roughly $3 a bottle, and it was more than enough for two cars.

It comes out as a thick rubbery goo, and dries in about 10 minutes. Once dry, simply reinstall the brake pad then wipe down the excess red goop that squeezes out. It’s a little messy, but you’re probably wearing rubber gloves when working with brake pads anyway.

Once installed the difference was night and day, no more brake squeaks.

Z3 Solution Window Blanket

Pros: Works much better than the BMW window blanket. On new cars it will prevent formation of the dreaded wave. On older cars it helps prolong rear window life.
Cons: Slightly bulkier than the BMW version. Not free.
Cost: $37.95 from Z3Solution

This article reviews the Z3 Solution alternative to the free BMW window blanket. The Z3 Solution product has been designed to minimize or eliminate the dreaded “wave” whcih forms when you leave the top down on your Z3. It does this by providing extra padding in critical areas. The blanket sells for $37.95 from Z3 Solution.

I’ll preface this article with a couple of comments:

* If you are leasing your Z3 and you plan on turning it back in, this article is probably not for you.

* If you plan on keeping your Z3 for a couple of years and are worried about it looking good, especially for resale, this is one of the products you should seriously consider.

The picture above shows two window-blankets. The one of the top is the Z3 Solution version, The one on the bottom is the standard BMW version. They are both made of just about the same type of flannel material, the BMW version is gray, the Z3 Solution version is beige. You can see from the picture that the Z3 Solution version is a bit smaller than the BMW version. There is one critical difference between the two of them: The blanket on the top can prevent the dreaded “wave” in the Z3 plastic windows.

The wave is the effect you see when you put your top down for an extended period of time. When you put the roof back up there is a slight wave which goes horizontally across the window. It’s caused by one of the roof supports hitting the window and creating pressure. Since the Z3 first came out, people have been trying to get rid of the wave by stuffing various things into the fold of the roof. There used to be round pillows you could buy and many people also used pipe insullation material in an attempt to get rid of the wave. None of these approaches worked very well.

Keith, of Z3 Solution, studied the folding of his roof and determined that many of the earlier attempts to combat the wave were really addressing the wrong part of the window. The actual culprit is not the place where the window folds, instead he determined that the second support from the back actually rubs along the window with a lot of pressure creating both the wave and the associated scratch marks.

Keith determined that some padding in the window blanket would be the perfect way to protect the window from the damage caused by the roof support. The problem was that padding the whole thing would mean that the blanket would be bulky in areas where the bulk wasn’t needed. The first think Keith did was to cut down the size of the blanket to just the critical window area. In this way the padded blanket places no extra strain on the roof which might lead to premature wear. The next thing was to pad only the lower two thirds of the blanket, eliminating the bulk at the critical bend in the window.

Keith was also concerned about the quality of the unit. He tested out various materials to simulate the BMW quality. The result is a product which might have come from BMW. Keith uses the same quality fabric, the same connectors and the same quality of fit and finish as the BMW unit. The only obvious difference is the longer loops on the BMW I mentioned that the longer loops and slightly shorter elastics on the BMW model do make it easier to handle and Keith said he would look into addressing this in production versions of the blanket. I have a ’97 2.8 with a hard top. In the fall I had the soft-top completely replaced by BMW, so I got a new window. The window has spent the winter crushed under the hard top, so when I took the top off for the spring I had a significant wave. Keith told me that the Z3 Solution blanket will not remove the wave, but it would keep newer cars from acquiring one. Based on experience, I have found if you hit the window with a hairdryer it will straighten out the plastic.

In several weeks of use, the blanket has practically eliminated the wave from my window. I’m very impressed and would recommend this highly to anyone who intends on keeping their car for a while. Using the Z3 Solution window blanket will definately prolong the life of your rear window and give you a much clearer view. With window replacement running anywhere from $150 and up, the $37.95 Z3 Solution Blanket seems like cheap insurance against a hefty repair bill.

Cleaning the Conforti Air Intake System

I’m a big fan of the Conforti Air Intake System, since installation the unit has not given me any trouble and has offered great performance (plus it sounds good). But the time had come to clean the filter. Thankfully cleaning this air intake is nowhere near as involved as cleaning the dinan air intake.

I simply unscrewed the bracket around the filter and then gave the filter a light tug. Once removed, I beat the dust off the filter with my hand then used water to flush it clean. I let it sit awhile to dry, then sprayed some more of that dust catching spray that came with the Conforti kit on the filter and reinstalled it. Later I was informed that soap and water is the recommended cleaning method.

While the filter was drying I looked at the area under the filer, there was a lot of sand and debris in there so I used a shop vac to clean up the area. Once everything was back together I went for a drive to see how much more power I could feel…. couldn’t tell a bit of difference, oh well cleaner is better anyway.

Gotcha Covered – BMW Boot Cover

I got a new job! – Yay!

Better pay, better title, better crew to work with. However, there was one big problem: In my old job the Z3, which is my daily driver, got parked in a garage. Nice and safe, walls on both sides, protected from the elements. I am now faced with the issue of parking in a public lot, with loads of other people with their doors aimed squarely at my car on a daily basis. In addition, since I like to keep my tonneau cover on during the summer months, I had to figure out something to keep the car interior protected from the elements (in the winter I run with the hard top, so it’s not as much of an issue). I, of course, suggested to management that they build me my own, private garage. The suggestion was not well received.

What to do?

Z3Solution to the rescue!

I remembered that Z3Solution was now offering a cover that also includes unique padded door protection. This would allow me to not only protect the cockpit, but also the sides of the car from those that would poke my baby. A cockpit cover is a great idea if you park outside a lot. Remember – BMW says that you must use your tonneau when you are running top-down or your top may get worn prematurely. Putting the tonneau on and taking it off is much more of a pain that putting on a cockpit cover. A Cockpit cover will also keep your interior cooler than leaving the roof up.

I ordered the cover the week before I was scheduled to start my new job in order to give me some time to get acquainted with it. I also own another cover from MM Marketing that I have used on occasion, but it was no where near as nice as the Z3Solution cover. The Z3Solution cover is cut much fuller than the MM Marketing version and also includes the door protection with built-in foam pads. I can actually put the cover on the car with the top up or down and it fits just fine.

The cover attaches at several points:

* There are Velcro ties in the front that attach to the wipers.

* There are small “barrels” in the back. These are basically fabric-covered tubes that can be shoved down between the tonneau cover or placed into the trunk opening to secure the back.

* Unique to the Z3Solution cover are the tie-downs that slip into the crack at the bottom of the door. These help secure the sides and the side-padding.

Overall Impressions

The quality of the cover is excellent. It is well made from something called “Weathershield” fabric from Nextec. Weathershield is light, compact and very weather resistant. While most covers have a weatherproof layer appied onto them, Weathershield actually has the waterproofing applied to each individual strand of fabric. This means that the protection is much better than most traditional car-covers (see comparison chart). It compares very favorably with NOAH, but with significantly less bulk. The stitching on the unit is very sturdy and all the parts look like they will last a long time. The entire cover and all parts that touch the car are covered in a soft flannel. The number of connection points to the car is excellent: two in the back, two in the front, two on either side. There have been several windy days and the top stayed securely anchored and I have noticed no “rubbing”. I have used the cover for several weeks and have found that the design works well with the top up or down. The ability of the top to repel water is simply amazing!

As I intend to use the cover to protect my top from weathering, being able put the cover on with the top up was critical to me. In the spring and fall it will act as a safeguard against the torrential rains we sometimes get in New England and in the summer it will protect the top from sunlight and keep the cockpit cool.

With the top up, it’s easy to attach the cover. Simply plunk it on top and make all the connections. It does require a trip around the car, but I can do it in about 20 seconds. Removal is even quicker. It’s not quite as easy to put the cover on with the top down (it tends to billow around a bit), but it’s also not particularly difficult. In general, it’s much more time consuming to put the cover on than to put the top up (assuming you don’t use the tonneau cover), but the extra protection justifies it’s use for me. If you do use the tonneau religiously, you’ll find it much easier to deal with a cockpit cover than taking the toneau off and raising the roof.

Before ordering the cover, I also considered a full car cover. I decided not to go that route because I did not want to put the cover on the car when it was dirty. I was primarily interested in protection for the parts susceptible to rain and sun: the interior and the fabric top.

The Z3Solution cover doestouch parts of the car and I’ll have to see what the long term effects will be, but early indications are good: the sides do not move significantly because of the bulk of the foam padding and the tie-downs, therefore the cover does not rub on the paint.

At $109 The Z3Solution cover is slightly more expensive that some of the competitors (MM Marketing offers its unit for about $80), but the full cut of the cover, the Weatherguard material and the ding protection make it well worth the increment. It’s significantly less expensive than a full body cover and takes up less space in the trunk (but it should be noted that the padding makes it bulkier than a normal cockpit cover).

The cover comes with a nice carrying case, but so far I’ve never used it. I just fold the thing up and dump it in the trunk.

Cockpit covers may not be for everyone. I have a number of friends who are comfortable with parking their cars outside for long periods of time with no protection. For me, however, the protection afforded by the cockpit cover, including the protection from the inconsiderate co-worker’s doors, easily justifies the cost of this new accessory…..and I get to keep my new job!

Comparison chart from www.covercraft.com

Z-Roof Cover With Built-In Door Ding Protection

Pros: Easy to Install, Good Protection, Lessons the Chance of Door Dings
Cons: Harder to fold and store because of the extra door padding
Cost: $79.99 from Z3 Solution

I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with the BMW boot cover. I would like to use it because it helps keep the inside of the top clean (and I like the looks of it). But it is such a pain to put on and take off I rarely use it except on long trips. On those rare occasions when I do use the boot cover I find myself wanting to leave the top down rather than hassle with uninstalling the boot cover and putting the top up when I park. I’m not comfortable leaving the top down all day while the car is parked, not so much for security reasons just don’t want to leave the interior exposed (birds, bright sun, rain, etc).

Z3 Solution (the same company that makes the magnetic stone guards) has a new car cover. Its kind of a mini car cover, specially designed for the Z3. It can be used with the top up or down, and works on Z3s with or without rollhoops, rollbars, windscreens etc. I first saw this new cover at the 1999 Z3 homecoming and recognized that it could be just the solution I was looking for. With this new cover I could put my top down, install the boot cover and use this cover rather than have to remove the boot cover and put the top back up when the car was parked. But the big advantage of using the Z3 Solution cover was the built in door ding protection. The lower portion of the cover that covers the doors has foam padding inserts that (at least in theory) would lesson your chance of getting a door ding. It doesn’t cover the entire door, but it does cover the portion of the door most likely to receive a door ding.

It takes me a couple minutes to install the cover in the morning, and about half that time to remove it. It attaches to the vehicle in 10 separate locations so it is very secure. One benefit of living in Oklahoma is that I can report the cover stays in place even after 8 hours of thirty plus mile per hour winds. However installing, uninstalling and/or folding a car cover in that kind of wind is not necessarily fun. Which leads me to my only negative point of this car cover. Because of the anti-door-ding foam padding, folding and rolling up the car cover is more difficult than I expected. However I have become more adept at it so it hasn’t been that big of an problem. Z3 Solution has a simular car cover without the anti-door-ding foam padding which should be easier to fold but then you give up the door ding protection (which at least to me is a very good feature).

Unintentionally, I tested this covers ability in the rain. A short-lived surprise afternoon shower left some standing water on the cover. But after careful removal of the cover (so not to dump the standing water in the cockpit) I was relieved to see that the interior had remained protected. I’m not sure you would want to rely on the covers ability to defend your car from rain all the time, but its nice to know that it can handle it.

Z3 Solutions CoverI don’t use this cover every day, but if the weatherman is forecasting several consecutive top-down days in a row I’ll use this cover and the BMW boot cover. Considering my parking situation at work I should probably use the Z3 Solution cover every day (to help protect myself from door dings). But so far I’ve really only used the cover on “top-down” days. The cover is designed to be used even when the Z3 top is up, which has some interesting possibilities. In the summer the use of this cover should repel some of the heat and keep the Z3 interior cooler. Look for a long term update to this article in the late summer of 2000 in regard to this.

When you consider all the potential benefits this cover has to offer, I think it is well worth the $79.99 price, but only if you really intend to use it. Z3 Solution also offers an optional bag that holds the rolled up cover. I find the bag to be useful since it limits the amount of space the cover takes up in your trunk.

HMS Window Blanket for BMW Convertibles

Pros: Provides additional protection for the delicate and expensive rear plastic window.
Cons: Harder to fold and store because of the bulkier design
Cost: 39.95

BMW created a device we owners quickly named the “window blanket”, it was a simple yet functional blanket that draped across the rear window and protected the window from scratches when the top was folded down. But the one thing the BMW blanket didn’t do was stop the window from creasing when the rear window folded incorrectly (with a wrinkle). HMS improved the BMW design and took it one step further by adding a bulky area to middle of the blanket which makes the window fold in a more rounded way in order to keep the window from creasing. It also appears HMS used a heavier fabric so there is some additional padding associated for the entire area that the blanket covers.

The bulky area appears to be filled with beans or something similar. The added weight from this bulky area forces the top to fold correctly and keeps it from folding to sharply (which can cause creasing). The improved design works better than the original design in protecting the top from these creases but there are some trade-offs. The HMS design is harder to fold and store because of the extra padding. The padded area is divided into three sections so folding it width wise is limited to three three sections. With the original BMW blanket I kept it tightly folded up and stored in one of the pockets of the trunk organizer. However with the bulkier HMS design this was no longer possible. I end up rolling it lengthwise and laying it in the area behind the center console. This might actually be a better location since it helps remind me to use the blanket when I want to put the top down.

I’m trying to get in the habit of using the boot cover and HMS blanket more often since I was starting to see some wear and tear on the plastic window. For this reason I like the HMS blanket more so than the BMW blanket. It keeps the top folded correctly and provides additional protection for the delicate and expensive rear plastic window.

Sold By:

HMS Motorsport

www.hms-motorsport.com

(888) HMS-3BMW

X-Pel’s Invisible Bra for the Z3

Pros: Protects the fragile paint on the Z3. Hard to detect from a distance of 4 or more feet.
Cons: Moderately hard installation
Cost: Contact XPel at http://www.xpel.com/ or 800-447-9928
The Days Events

  • Gathering at Rory’s
  • Fixing Paint Chips
  • X-Pel
  • Swapping Mirrors
  • Boot Cover Swap
  • Chrome Front Grill
  • The BMW Z3 is painted with EPA backed “environmentally friendly” paint. The makers claim that the new paint is less susceptible to fading and oxidation, but an apparent downside is that the new paint is much more brittle. While BMW has never openly admitted this, the evidence is overwelming. Rock chips are appearing on nearly all BMW Z3s and there really isn’t a solution to stopping them. While owners can’t win the war in the long run they can protect themselves and prolong the life of their paint using a product developed by 3M.

    3M makes a thin clear layer of protective film which can be applied directly over the paint. With this protective layer of clear skin the Z3 has additional protection against rock chips. It appears 3M decided to not market this new product directly to consumers but rather they offered the product to vendors that could make custom kits specifically made for certain vehicles. This is where X-Pel enterers the picture.

    X-Pel has kits made for the Z3 and M roadster that fit over the more vulnerable areas on the Z3. The front bumper and front 1/3 section of the hood are the most frequent places where the chips occur. The X-Pel kit covers all this area. In addition X-Pel also offers additional (optional) kits for the headlights, foglights, rearview mirrors and rear fender flares.

    Installing the kit requires patients and lots of water. The Z3 is watered down with soapy water so the thin layer can me float and move easily during the fitting process. A Squeegee is then used to press the film against the paint and remove the water from under the film. With the film in direct contact with the paint it adheres to the surface and stays in place. The film itself is not water tight so any remaining water trapped under the film eventually evaporates.

    Once installed, the thin layer can be seen on close inspection, but its difficult (you have to be looking for it). From a distance of four or more feet the kit can not be seen. On closer distances it is possible if you look for the edges. Occasionally you can catch it at the right angle and see the difference in refection. I stood over Larry’s car for several minutes trying to find that “just right” angle to show this to you in a picture. In the picture on the right you can see a flatter and slightly more yellow tint from the covered area. The yellow tint is really more of trick of the camera than an actual trait of the X-Pel kit. To the naked eye I never saw this yellow tint (sometimes cameras see things we don’t).

    X-Pel said that once applied, wax and wash the car the same as you usual. Except you should take a little more caution around the edges so you don’t get wax buildup on the leading edge of the kit. The expected life of the kit is four to five years.

    The Z3 club in Texas had a gathering in Dallas that didn’t involve driving but rather car care. The club invited X-Pel to come along and demonstrate the kit. By the time the event was over X-Pel had installed their kits on several Z3s and M roadster and each owner was pleased with their purchase.

    Swapping Mirrors

    I Can See Clearly Now, Too!

    Let me state for the record that I DO enjoy the fact I have a folding rear window like the classic roadsters of days gone by. The day I start whining about wanting a defrosted glass rear window, seating for four, and more storage space — please sentence me into a LeBaron for 30 days. Even so, after reading Robert’s eye-opening article on Meguiar’s plastic window product, I figured I should recommission the one I bought months ago and shelved away.

    I’ve never really done too much to clean mine since delivery back in September ’96. Upon recommendation from the dealer, I remember once trying Pledge spray on it. That didn’t work well. It just resulted in me having to exert lots of work getting rid of oily residue off the surface. I HAVE taken care of the window by using the supplied Rear Window Blanket #82-11-1-469-778, but two years will build a hazing no matter what precautions are taken. This hazing or fogging is caused by microscratches on the surface. The bad practice of using a glass cleaner might rid the surface of dirt and waterspots, but thanks to FredK’s excellent explanation, you’ll know better to stay away from it…besides, it doesn’t remove the microscratches.

    Robert used the heavy-duty regimen of Meguiar’s #17 Cleaner followed by Meguiar’s #10 Polish. I used a slightly different product, Meguiar’s #18 Cleaner/Polish. I suspect most who’ve cared for their rear window as I have will only need to use this all-in-one product. The steps are quite simple — spray on, wipe with cloth, and use a drier side to buff clean.

    I elected to use smooth cotton polishing cloths. They were the consistency of a thick cotton t-shirt (which would probably work just as well). One cloth was used to spread the sprayed liquid, another cloth was used to polish dry the area. I worked in small sections at a time and only used straight back and forth motions… not circular! Both inside and outside of the window was cleaned this way. The passenger’s half was done first to show how dramatic the difference was.

    Use newspaper or a beach towel to line the rear console plastic as errant spray droplets will be bothersome to buff clean. Once you’re finished, the plastic window will look just as clear as the day it rolled off the assembly line! The bottle was hardly used and I suspect the window will only require no more than three cleanings a year.

    banner advertisement

    BMW Roadster Tonneau

    Pros: Installs Easily, Covers Cockpit, Lightweight
    Cons: Requires Boot Cover
    Cost: $78.90 (with shipping)

    I’ve always been in a love/hate relationship with the roadster’s boot cover. I liked the way the Z3 looked with the boot cover installed over the folded down top, and I recognize the protective benefits of using the boot cover. However it is such a pain to install that I seldom used it except on long drives (when I knew the top was going to stay down). The problem was that I was never comfortable enough to leave the car parked with the top down. The exposed leather interior would be subject to bird bombs, harmful UV rays, dirt/dust, and prying eyes.

    Back in highschool I drove an MGB that had this great accessory called a tonneau cover. This thick vinyl cover snapped around the cabin of the MGB on specially designed snaps that were part of the interior. That tonneau cover effectively covered the interior of the car and it was much easier to take on and off than the convertible top was to put up and down. The other really neat feature is that it had a zipper down the middle so you could unzip just the drivers side and drive the car with the tonneau cover still in place. I’ve been wanting a cover similar to that MGB one for my BMW roadster every since I first got the car. However no one made one, and from a development standpoint since the car wasn’t designed for one chances are it would never exist.

    M&M Marketing produced a car cover that was very similar to what I was looking for, and I almost got one. Except the M&M design is really closer to a car cover and I never really cared for the looks of it. From a utility standpoint I’m told that the M&M design works well. It stands up okay to the elements and is moderately easy to take on and off. But it just isn’t that attractive to look at (to me it always looked like a small tent had been pitched over the car). I’m told that the M&M cover is actually a Miata cover that happens to fit, but sometimes it looks just a tad too small to me.

    Apparently Carter Lee had the same thoughts and undertook a project to design a simple tonneau cover specifically made for the BMW roadster. Carter’s design fits flush with the dash and it is custom made for the Z3’s interior. There are “pockets” designed to go over the seats and dash pod. Carter even designed two different versions to account for Z3s with and without roll hoops. Carter’s design was not the same as the original MGB tonneau I had always wanted, but it was so close that I just had to have one.

    My first indication that Carter had gone all out in making these was the very professional packaging that arrived shortly afterwards. However, after admiring his packaging handy work I immediately ripped the bag open, tossed the instructions and went out to the garage to try it out. Initially I fumbled around trying to figure out the best way to install it (guess I should have read the instructions first). But finally decided that I like to slip the custom pockets over the seats, then get the front of the cover tucked in, secure the sides via the velcro straps, and lastly tuck the back of the cover into the crease at the rear of the boot cover. First couple times took me a few minutes but now I’ve got it down pretty good.

    Basically there are four places in the design that attach the tonneau to the roadster. The leading edge of the cover has a foam like trim sewn into it, this is designed to be tucked into the area where the windshield meets the dash. The foam slips into the crack with a push but then expands and secures rather well. Around each side mirror the tonneau cover has two velcro straps that secure the tonneau to the mirror. This works well but does require that you leave the windows down. In the back the tonneau cover tucks into the convertible top storage area along the trailing edge of the boot cover. This leaves a nice smooth taught look, I’m told by Doug and Eileen Morgan that it even keeps water out of your interior should you get caught in a quick shower (however it shouldn’t be considered an acceptable cover if you are expecting a rain storm).

    With Carter’s tonneau my MZ3 finally had a cover that matched its sleek styling. The tonneau fit nicely over the instrument pod, seats and roll hoops (non roll hoop version available). It seemed pretty secure but I wanted to put this thing to the test. I got out my $30 Sears electric leaf blower and and decided to give it a wind tunnel test, at the same time I was curious to see what the motion sensor on my Clifford car alarm would think of a fluttering tonneau cover. What I found out is that if the cover is properly installed I could not blow it loose. The first time I didn’t get the front tucked in good and was able to get the front of the cover loose but the velcro straps and rear tuck kept the cover in place. Not sure what this says about the motion sensor, but it never went off even the one time the front of the cover came loose.

    Needless to say I was pretty impressed with what Carter created, and I knew it was a keeper but I decided to do some additional tests. At the time I got the cover we were in the middle of an extreme heat wave in Texas. Everyday after work it was a race to see how quickly I could drop the convertible top to let off all the heat that had built up in the cabin. For a week I kept a fancy digital thermometer in the car, and every time I parked I would place the additional temperature sensor out side the car in the shade. During that week I found out that on average Carter’s cover kept the interior of the car about 7 degrees cooler than with the top up. I’m sure the color of the tonneau had to do with that (silver vs black) but I suspect the open air made the biggest difference. Carter now makes a version of the cover in black and there is a part of me that wishes I would have ordered the black version, but I’m sure it gets a little hotter.

    Removal of the cover is super easy. I just unvelcro the cover from one of the side mirrors and pull, off it comes. A couple of quick folds or more likely just wad it up and shove it into any storage space like the top storage behind the seat (if you have it). I usually shove it in the trunk over the tiny crevice above the power top motor. If you have the trunk organizer it would fit in there as well.

    I asked Doug Morgan what he thought of his tonneau cover (he has a black design without the roll hoop pocket), Doug replied

    It does keep leaves and dust out very effectively and at least moderate amounts of rain; yes I have tested this out. If you are careful you can even get the water out without getting it on your interior. For those that live in the hotter areas of the country it does a great job of keeping the interior cool. It became an invaluable item on the BAD IV tour to keep the seats from burning your legs when returning from one of the little jaunts (the steering wheel and door edge didn’t burn either). Carter’s tonneau is a must have on the Homecoming Convoy also. The tonneau is make of lightweight water repellant fabric, which makes for great protection without being bulky so it avoids taking up valuable trunk space.

    Personally, my only complaint is that it requires the boot cover, without the boot cover it really doesn’t tuck into or get secured in the back. It is still usable but I suspect a strong breeze could blow the back end loose. But considering it is only $78.90 it really is a fantastic cover. I think the fact that it is designed by a BMW Z3 owner tells you that the product is well thought out and functional. I’m very impressed with it and use it quite often, since that initial leaf blower test it has never come loose, and it has still never caused a problem with my car alarm. I guess the motion sensor goes right through the material because the motion sensor still works.

    Carter sells the tonneau cover via a web page, and has lots of information about the roadster tonneau at that web site. Carter offers versions designed for Z3s with the BMW roll hoops and for Z3s without the roll hoops. Both versions of the roadster tonneau are available in black and gray. They are made of a strong, lightweight, compact, and water-repellant nylon taffeta. Whichever version and color you choose the total cost including shipping is only $78.90

    Discuss this article and other Convenience upgrades in the

    ///MZ3.Net discussion forum.

    Cleaning the Plastic Rear Window

    To say my rear window was dirty was an understatement. Honestly, I can’t remember ever washing it in the time I’ve owned the MZ3. It had gotten to the point that rear visibility, especially with the windscreen, was zero. With the homecoming approaching, I figured it was time to clean this window. Turned out to also be a good time to try out the Meguiar’s window cleaner and polish to see just how good this stuff is.

    In the graphic below, the top picture is of the window before I did anything (except remove the windscreen). The middle picture is after I used Meguiar’s #17 Clear Plastic Cleaner on both the inside and the outside. The cleaner was difficult to use, especially on the inside. This stuff coats on then dries to a paste just like car wax does. Rubbing off that dried pasty/wax was difficult especially when trying to work on the inside of the window. It took me about 30 minutes but the results were simply amazing. Except for a harsh black line of buildup in a fold mark, it removed everything.

    The next step was to use the Meguiar’s #10 Clear Plastic Polish, I had already decided I was not going to mess with the inside window since my back was aching from the cleaner. But honestly it wouldn’t have been very hard since the polish doesn’t dry to a paste like the cleaner. The polish took the buildup in the fold line off with very little effort. The very bottom picture in the graphic below was after the cleaner and the polish. Looks like a practically brand new window as far as I am concerned. I’m very pleased with the Meguiar’s cleaner and polish, however I think I’ll clean and polish the window a little more regularly from now on.

    I’ve seen BMW dealerships sell some of the Meguiar’s products in their parts department. But if you are having a hard time finding them you can always purchase directly from Meguiar’s. Meguiar’s has a web site with a dealer locator, but you have to call the number below to actually place an order.

    To Order Call: 1 (800) 545 3321

    Fax: 1 (949) 752-6659

    Or Write: 17991 Mitchell South, Irvine, CA 92614