The FOGG/FONG’ed 2.8 Cold Air Intake

Pros: Increased performance, low cost, keeps stock air filter
Cons: Do not screw up cutting the plastic cover for the headlamp
Cost: $30 and 2 to 3 hours of your time

First I want to thank Shawn Fogg for the original idea to supply cold air to the intake, WITHOUT spending up to $500, and labor. His instruction and basic concept to modify the air intake helped me to modify the 2.8’s airbox & intake delivery system.

* Tools needed: 10-mm open/boxed end wrench.

* Metal File

* 8-mm ¼-inch socket wrench.

* 6″ long ¼-inch socket extension.

* Flat head screw driver-med.

* Philip head screw driver-med.

* Dremel & cutting wheel OR a keyhole saw.

* Magic marker.

* Hot glue gun with heavy-duty glue sticks.

* Hair dryer

* Things to Buy: Go to the nearest Home Depot or the like and in the ventilation section get an aluminum 5″ to 4″ duct adapter. This is a tubular piece to allow a 5″ hose to plug into a 4″ hose.

* Buy a 4-inch aluminum flexible duct tube. This will be the new air supply tube.

* Buy a 5-inch stainless steel hose clamp.

* Hot glue gun and heavy-duty glue sticks, if you do not have any.

** NOTE THAT ANY DIRECTIONS I MENTION IS IN BODY POSITION **

PLEASE READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS. You will notice that the pictures show the completed product and not before modification.

1. Basic design of the 2.8 (00) airbox and air supply route: The stock unit’s air supply comes from the driver side of the radiator. It funnels through a 3.5 X 4.5-inch triangular opening.

2. That opening then feeds into a semi-enclosed space that surrounds the rear of the headlamp assembly and wire harness.

3. From there, the air funnels once more through a 3-inch tube that goes into the airbox.

4. The air passes through the filter then into another funnel (3-inches diameter) that leads to the air-mass sensor.

1. Making the Intake: First thing you need to do is to make the 4″ inlet out of the adapter you bought at Home Depot.

2. To do this on the expansion funnel (between the 4″ and 5″ tubes) you need to drill out the two rivets. This lets you separate the adapter into 3 pieces, the 4″ tube, the expansion funnel and the 5″ tube.

3. We only need the 4″ tube with the ‘rib’ on the side that was connected to the expansion funnel which opened up to the 5″ piece.

4. Using the hack saw, take the 4×36″ diameter tube and cut it down to 6 to 8-inches. Make sure that the tube IS NOT EXPANDED when you are measuring and cutting. This will become your inlet into the airbox.

5. Now dry fit the adapter and tube together. It will be a very tight fit. You might need to cut a 2″ slice, either on the tube or adapter, to make the tube slide onto the adapter correctly.

6. Once you are satisfied with the fit, take apart the tube and adapter and place it aside for later

1. Removing the 2.8 (00) airbox from the engine compartment: Remove the stock paper filter and holder from the airbox.

2. Use the flat head screwdriver to unfasten the (2) snap clips that holds the rubber hose & air mass sensor. Slide off the hose from the airbox. When removing the unit, there will be a rubber O-ring between the airbox & runner hose. Its purpose is to maintain a good seal between the plastic & rubber.

Tech Tip: When reinstalling the O-ring, install the O-ring, then wet your CLEAN finger and run it along the inside diameter of the O-ring. This will allow you to slide the rubber hose together with the plastic airbox when you are ready to reassemble the components.

3. Snap off the overfill hose from the radiator. It is located on top to the passenger side of the airbox.

4. To unbolt the airbox, you only need to unbolt (1) 10-mm nut, located on the driver side, plus the rubber hose to the engine. You do not need to undo the nut all the way.

5. Now this will take some fannagling, the small overfill hose to the radiator will be in the way during the removal of the airbox. To remove the airbox, you will need to pull & stretch the tubing around the airbox, as you are pulling the air box out of the engine compartment. The easiest way I was able to remove the air box is by stretching the tubing towards the passenger side of the airbox.

6. Once the airbox is out, you will want to clean out all the little bugs, dust and rocks the filter has trapped. It is also a good time to replace the filter – – mine had almost 18,000 miles.

1. Removing & modifying the air restrictions within the airbox for the 2.8 (00) When looking inside the airbox, you will see a plastic funnel that is attached to the driver side of the airbox. The funnel can be unattached by unscrewing the Phillips head screw on the outside wall of the airbox. The funnel can be pulled straight out of the airbox.

2. Now is time to put on your SAFETY GLASSES. You will be cutting the funnel in half. Starting at the widest portion of the funnel, (the side that empties into the airbox).

* Take the hacksaw and saw from the widest portion of the funnel towards the inlet of the funnel.

Tech Tip: There is a line that you can see that is called a parting line. The term is used for injection molded components. You can use the parting line as a guide.

* Now stop short of cutting into the ribbed area.

* Take the hacksaw and start cutting on the side that DOES NOT have the screw boss that attaches the funnel to the airbox. (You need to be able to remount this in the airbox).

* Use a file to smooth the edges. Then use a damp cloth to clean the surface. Once that is done, you may reinstall the modified funnel. Do not forget to use the screw to hold it back in place.

1. Removing the 2.8 (00) headlamp and fog lamp assemblies First, we will remove the fog lights (the easier of the two).

2. Using a medium sized flat head screw driver, remove the plastic cover that is towards the passenger side of the fog lamp.

3. You will see (2) 8-mm hex head bolts that hold the lamp in place. Remove them.

4. To remove the lamp assembly, just pivot the lamp from the passenger side edge and pull towards you (front of the car).

5. To remove the wiring, it is located behind the lamp. There are (2) pressure clips on either side of the wire harness. You might need to employ someone with small hands (your wife, girlfriend, your young son or me… LOL) to be able to reach behind the lamp and squeeze the clips together.

6. Once the wire harness has been released, remove the fog lamp and place in a safe spot.

7. Second is the headlamp assembly.

8. Located behind the lamp and in front of the airbox location. You will see a plastic housing that has the wiring for the headlamp going into through rubber grommets.

9. Those grommets are on plastic doors, that are removable from the plastic housing.

10. You will need to reach inside the housing to twist and remove the individual light bulbs from the headlamp.

Tech Tip: Do not touch the surfaces of the bulbs with your fingers (the oils from the skin will help DECREASE the life of the bulb).

11. Now is the fun part of unscrewing the headlamp from the car.

12. There are (4) 8-mm hex head bolts. You will need to use the 6-inch extension arm with the 8-mm socket.

Tech Tip: Use a magnet to magnetize your sockets. This will help you REMOVE and not loose the screws down within the car body.

* (2) are easy to see – they are located on top portion of the headlamp.

* (1) is on the passenger side, accessible through a steel hole.

* (1) is on the driver side accessible through a steel hole.

13. Once all the screw bolts are free, remove the headlamp and place in a safe location.

1. New Air Supply Tube You will notice once you have removed the headlamp, you will notice on the bottom portion of the plastic headlamp housing, there is a 2 ½-inch hole that appears to be plugged. How ever, you will be able to remove that plug by pressing in the (3) plastic clips towards the center of the hole. It will just fall down towards the fog lamp.

2. Now you get to cut things up. You will now follow the instructions of Shawn Fogg (with the necessary modifications to make it work for the 2.8 (MY00) Z3.

* When I cut my new air supply hole, I did not remove the plastic cover from the car. I believe that it is possible to remove it, but it would be a problem to remove and reinstall. BMW used a something similar to a drywall expander nail system. It is easy to remove the nail, but not too easy to remove the expander part that is in the wall. To remove either part, you would need to use flat head screw driver and needle nose pliers. You would have a greater chance of scratching the paint, during the removal of the units. That is why I left the plastic cover in.

* Now comes the fun part, you need to cut a 4″ hole where the stock hole is. Put the 4″ side of the inlet over the hole and draw a new circle on it with the marker. Do not center the new hole over the old one. You want the new hole to be as far to the passenger side of the box as you can make it. There is limited real estate to enlarge the hole. In addition, the surface of the area is not flat.

Tech Tip: INITIALLY CUT THE HOLE SMALL AND WORK YOUR WAY TO THE CORRECT SIZE. YOU ONLY GET TO CUT THE PLASTIC ONCE!

* If you have kept the plastic cover installed, I HIGHLY SUGGEST covering any exposed areas that hot plastic bits might fly to.

* Now PUT ON YOUR EYE PROTECTION!!!!! – Using whatever method you decided on, cut out that 4″ circle. This is the most time consuming part of the project. If you use a Dremel, you will experience hot, nearly liquid plastic flying around, so be careful!

* When I cut my hole, I had to make sure I had some land area to allow the new air supply funnel to be mounted on a semi-flat surface. This way it would be easy to apply the hot glue.

3. After you cut the hole, test fit the inlet into it. The inlet should fit through the hole but stop at the ‘rib’ on the inlet. For the test, it is easier if you just put the 4″ side through the top of the plastic cover. If you cannot get it to fit use the Dremel’s grinding wheel or a file to smooth and enlarge the hole. The fit needs to be tight as possible, WITHOUT distorting the inlet.

4. After you are satisfied with the fit, you may dry fit the aluminum tubing. This way you can determine if you need to resize the length of the tube.

5. Now is the time to clean the inside of the box.

6. Scrub out the inside of the air box with a brillo pad or something similar to remove all the plastic bits that got thrown around when you cut the hole.

7. Also, use a damp cloth to wipe down & remove any particles remaining.

8. After you get it all cleaned out, dry it.

9. Now put the inlet into the airbox for real.

10. Attach the aluminum tubing to the 4-inch adapter. Keep the aluminum tube UNSTRECHED and UNBENT. Do not attach the hose clamp at this time.

11. You will install the assembly from the TOP of the plastic cover (over the fog lamp). The side with the rib goes inside of the box with the 4″ tube & aluminum tube will be pointing down towards the fog lamp. The rib will keep the inlet from pulling through the box if you cut the hole properly.

12. Now slide the hose clamp from the bottom of the aluminum tube and tighten. Make sure to have it snug up against the bottom of the plastic cover. Do not overtighten the hose clamp as you could deform the inlet.

13. Now the top of the plastic cover, you will be applying hot glue between the rib and the floor of the plastic cover.

14. A slight air leak here isn’t critical, as it’s still before the air filter, but do the best you can. Do NOT use silicone glue as it could cause problems with your O2 sensors.

15. Let the glue cure for a hour, good time for a beer break – – if you are of legal age =:o

16. After the glue has cured, you will now need to stretch and bend the aluminum tube down and towards the front of the fog lamp assembly.

17. You will notice that my aluminum tube is bent slightly towards the plastic cover for the fog lamp. I am leaving that cover off to have a semi-ram-air effect to the air box. However, as Shawn said in his discoveries, he did not notice any difference when he place a scoop below the fog lamp. In addition, there was enough air movement going around the complete fog lamp to allow plenty of cold air to enter the tube.

18. The use of aluminum helps keep the tube in position and is easy to relocate, if you are not satisfied of its current placement.

19. You will need to use the fog lamp to determine good placement.

20. Once you are satisfied, reinstall everything like before.

21. One thing that I did before I drove my car with the modifications, was to disconnect the power from the battery for at least 24 hours. During the workweek is the best time.

22. Please note that I have NO modified computer chip. Therefore, I expect better results with persons who have the modified chip

* After thoughts: I did notice an increase of torque using my butt-seat-sensor. I sold my old G-tech unit, so I cannot verify any decrease of 0-60 times.

* The sound is deeper than stock.

* I still have the stock exhaust. I am looking at a Supersprint unit.

* I do not have a modified computer chip. I am debating between a Land Shark or a Dinan chip.

* Some people might be thinking why not just, run the new air supply from the fog lamp area to the air box directly. After talking with Shawn about Hydro-lock, I felt that connecting the tube all the way might up the possibility of it actually happening. Having the tube not connected will almost eliminate that chance.

Dinan Cold Air Intake for the 2.8 Z3

Pros: Performance, Sound
Cons: Difficult Installation
Cost: $399

After receiving the Dinan snorkel, I looked over the instructions. They looked very sparse and included no pictures and only one diagram.

As recommended, I read through the instruction before starting, and still could not glean what it was supposed to doing – even though I knew what the outcome was supposed to be.

The other part that was missing was a list of tools needed to complete the job. This is important with this install as the proper tools make it so much easier to complete the job in the small areas the snorkel fits in.

So, based on the provided instructions and a little help from the Baba, I was able to complete the job in a relatively short time – even though I had to take apart a good portion of my work to retrieve a wayward socket head.

Based on my experiences, I decided to write up some better instructions to eliminate some confusion I experienced, to input some tips that will eliminate the need for a second set of hands, and provide the much needed information left out of the Dinan documentation.

List of required tools:

Small socket wrench – recommend a small ¼ inch drive

Socket driver (screw driver type) – recommend a small one (¼ inch drive) with extension(s) to provide 6 inches or more of length

6, 8, 10, and 13mm socket heads

16mm open end wrench

Medium blade screwdriver

Small fine tooth saw

Conventions:

The instructions are oriented relative to you sitting behind the wheel of the car. Although you cannot install the snorkel sitting behind the seat of the car, this orientation is necessary.

Directions:

As with the Dinan instruction, I suggest you at least read a number of steps ahead of any step so as to “visualize” the next instruction before you start.

Remove the two 10mm bolts holding the factory air box from the front of the left fender.

Release the clamps from the sides of the Air Mass Meter.

Remove the factory air box by pulling the airflow meter from the air box and pulling straight up and slightly on the air box. The air box intake is stuck in a space next to the headlight, so remove slowly so as not to tear the foam cushion around the intake.

Disconnect 2 power connectors from behind the headlight assembly. Unscrew the turn signal light connector and remove light from headlight assembly.

Locate the four 8mm screws holding the headlight assembly. Below or behind each is a headlight alignment bushing. In order to maintain proper headlight alignment, you must keep these bushings in place while removing the screws. The bushings are a 16mm hex with a slit in each side. If you have open end wrench that you can fit on the bushing, it is best. Otherwise, locate the slit on the bushing and use the screwdriver blade to lock the bushing in place while removing each of the screws holding the headlight assembly in place.

Disconnect the horn power connector and remove the horn and horn mounting bracket. You will need to relocate the horn and its bracket. However, it is much easier to get to the horn mounting bracket bolt if you first remove the horn from the bracket. Re-assemble horn on bracket once removed.

Remove the lower left (remember orientation) bumper shock nut and use this as the new horn mounting bracket attaching point. Tighten the nut only finger tight as you may have to adjust the horn position later.

Assemble the K&N filter, the air filter bracket, the filter support bracket, the support bracket screw clamps and screws, and the filter clamp as shown in the picture. Tighten the filter clamp only enough to hold the filter in place. Place the screw clamps on the support bracket so that the small holes of the clamps are towards the middle of the support bracket. Attach the support bracket to the filter bracket with the supplied screws, but do not tighten.

NOTE: Completely ignore the 2 holes in the air filter bracket. They are never used. I spent quite a time trying to figure where these attached.

Insert the filter assembly into the area just behind the fog light so that the bent part of the filter bracket mates with the lip on the frame rail and the curve of the air filter bracket fits to the contour of the curve of the wheel well.

Align the upper hole of the air filter support bracket with the bottom of the hole on the lip in front of the wheel well and attach in place with the second support bracket screw. Tighten both support bracket screws.

Align the lip of the bend part of the air filter bracket with the lip of the frame rail and attach with the 2 supplied clips.

Adjust the horn so that the power connector can be re-attached and re-attach the horn power connector. Tighten the nut holding the horn bracket in place.

Locate the mounting bracket on the left fenderwell below the airflow meter. If a hose is attached, remove the hose from the attaching clip and remove the clip from the mounting bracket.

Fit the airflow meter support bracket to the left side of the airflow meter. Align the holes at the bottom of the airflow meter support bracket with the bracket on the fenderwell and attach with supplied 6mm bolts.

Secure the airflow meter support bracket to the airflow meter with the long wire tie. Secure the hose formally attached to the mounting bracket to the airflow support bracket with the shorter wire tie.

Slip the #36 hose clamp on the reduced end of the silicone hose and slip the reduced end of the silicone hose to the airflow meter. Tighten the clamp.

While supporting the filter from the bottom, loosen the clamp around the air filter enough to fit the bottom end of the carbon fiber tube into the filter open enough so that the clamp will securely hold it. Fit the carbon fiber tube into the filter opening and retighten the clamp.

Slip the #48 hose clamp over the end of the silicone hose. Slip the end of the carbon filter tube well into the silicone hose and tighten the clamp to hold the tube in place.

Cut the headlight adjuster flang(es) as necessary to allow the headlight assembly to fit in the mounting area with clearance between the headlight adjuster and the carbon fiber tube.

Refit the headlight assembly into position and secure with mounting screws. Ensure the alignment bushings do not move when re-mounting the headlight.

Insert turn signal light into headlight assembly and secure. Re-attach headlight power connections.

Check all connections for tight fit

Review

So, how is the new air snorkel? The extra air the 2.8 gets makes a big difference (particularly when coupled with the Dinan chip). The engine response better and the stock exhaust has a much better tone…particularly when above 3.5K rpm and under load (read, romping on the gas).

An upgraded intake is a definite plus to any Z3. However, at $399, the Dinan intake is a bit pricey for what you get. Particularly since the filter does not open to the outside air. There is probably a better way to make modifications to the existing intake to provide the extra air the engine craves. I have been considering a couple designs myself and plan on keeping the Dinan intake if just to have a comparison should I fabricate a different design myself.